Query Rejections Due To Word Count

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I’m currently busy editing my novel, so my next post in my Query & Publish agent analysis is going to be delayed one or two weeks. Meanwhile, I did an analysis of tweets from agents that specifically rejected queries due to length. For example,

ericruben2

75kmg

109klong

Here’s the chart (click on it to see a larger version):

rejectionsnew.PNG
Red dots are tweet rejections from agents. Green area are word count suggestions from Cassandra here.

Of course, people disagree on word count all the time, and so do agents. Here are other blogs talking about it:

Now, back to editing. Good luck!

Featured image by Anastasia Zhenina.


I’m actively looking for agents and publishers for my book. More info here.


Default Disclaimer: I’m not a writer, I have a hard time paying attention to detail, I overuse adverbs, I start a lot of sentences with ‘I’, and I often confuse words that are similar. More importantly, I reserve the right to change my mind at any time, in which case I’ll deny I ever wrote it. Please let me know if you find something that is too embarrassing. This blog is riddled with typos and creative grammar problems, but it’s mine. Luckily, I can always blame my mistakes on the fact that English is not my first language. Or hackers.


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  • Everyone’s a Critic - When classic novels get harsh reviews, and even fake writers are chastised, your book will definitely have more than its share of criticism. Or to be more formal, haters gonna hate.
  • Verb, do you even lift? - Adverbs, the next twist on my ongoing backwards journey to learn to write after I wrote my adult science fiction book.
  • Emotional Cheat Sheet - This emotional cheat sheet is based on the wheel chart, but it's longer, with no misspells or duplicates, and in an easier-to-read format.
  • He thought; therefore, he was. - Writing can be tense and personal - or how I accidentally wrote a book in first person and present tense.

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